Monday, 16 November 2009

Against the Odds

This, apparently, is going to be Labour's next party political broadcast:



Against the Odds was shown at Labour's conference in the Autumn and went down a storm with the party faithful. So much so that Ellie Gellard, well-known Labour twitterer and blogger launched an online campaign to get the film adopted as Labour's next PPB. According to the New Statesman, the powers that be have adopted it.

So, many congratulations to Ellie and her comrades.

But - and there's a very big but - Against the Odds is simply dreadful. It may warm the hearts of the New Labour faithful but there's simply no way this will resonate outside of the party's already-committed base. What works for the activists doesn't necessarily chime with the public. And especially in this case. Without a hint of irony Against the Odds spends all of its two-and-a-half minutes dressing the government up in the best labour movement traditions, while conveniently ignoring how Blair and Brown have crapped on the movement that sustained them. It really is distasteful hypocritical guff.

I think this chap in the YouTube comments box about sums it up best:
Labour should hang their heads in shame when watching this video. Workers rights? Don't make me laugh. Where were you when the CWU was on strike - oh I remember , telling us to get back to work , that our working conditions were just fine, and that Royal Mail is a wonderful employer. You lost my vote when you invaded Iraq, you'll not get it back until you return to the old and proper workers values!
Amen.

12 comments:

PhilC said...

Did I miss it or has Michael Foot been wiped from the montage of Labour leaders?

Phil BC said...

He's in there in some black and white footage, marching. A much more dynamic image than the shambling one he conveyed while Labour leader.

PhilC said...

Yes, just spotted at 1.05. Worried he's been replaced by a pot plant.

Phil BC said...

What tickles me is the New Statesman are reporting an apparatchik as saying this is evidence the leadership are listening to the grassroots. As if actioning a petition backing an insultingly bad PPB is evidence of inner party democracy.

bristolwestpaul said...

Does anyone except the party fiathful watch PPBs?

Michael Wincott said...

I doubt it will go out as it is. I'm guessing it will be remixed and bits added on.

northofwestminster said...

This is a terrible idea, and does nothing more than reinforce how out of touch the Labour Party High Heid Yins are. Voters couldn’t care less about the history of the Labour Party, what they care about is job security and the future of their children. The few floating voters who watch this will be totally switched off, the Labour supporters who watch this will think, “NHS, yes that was a good idea, but what the hell have you done recently that reflects our values?”
As for this being a grassroots campaign, well that’s just a joke. How is an Internet petition originating in France and signed by nonparty members grassroots?
Or is it just that the Labour Party have no money left, so they’ll stick any old bit of video on the telly cause it’s cheaper that way?

HarpyMarx said...

Yeah, that made me laugh too about New Labour listening to the grassroots. Erm, if they were interested in listening to the grassroots then they would re-establish LP democracy, debate at conference, stop parachuting NL clones into constituencies....

I am sure Keir Hardie would be spinning in his grave seeing that shite of a broadcast. Oh, and what was all that re NHS/welfare state when they want to privatise it and contract it out to the private sector.

And late last wk it was death knell of income support, an important and vital welfare benefit, as NL has abolished it in the new Welfare Reform Act, which contains harsh conditionality, penalisation, sanctions and further misery.

NL has shafted it's own grassroot members and core voters so much that it simply hasn't got a fecking clue how to re-connect with them and whether NL actually wants to.

Paul said...

I was going to comment sadonically and slightly wistfully. But I'm a Labour party member, and therefore can't bring myself to just yet. I'll recover my bonhomie later, probably.

andy newman said...

I think it is good.

I know it got as very positive reception among the GMB delegation at conference.

Phil BC said...

Yes, good among Labour-loyal and/or committed trade unionists. Not much good for floating voters, never mind those who've been driven away from Labour.

leftoutside said...

Yes its very stirring, but it leaves me slightly angry that 12 years of Labour hasn't achieved more.

To most people who are interested in their jobs and family they are going to compare the foundation of the NHS with Quantitative easing (if they've heard of it) and come away disillusioned.